Certification Programme in

Humanitarian Medical Logistics Practices

MedLog is aimed at experienced logisticians and medical specialists handing the medical supply within humanitarian organizations. The self-paced distance learning is designed specifically for those presently working (or plan to work) in operational supply chain positions within humanitarian organizations.
There are no academic pre-requisites to joining the programmes. Less experienced logisticians are recommended to take the Certification in Humanitarian Logistics programmes first.

How will you benefit?

logisticians will be able to:

Plan and operate the medical supply chain with more confidence in your knowledge of the special technical and quality assurance requirements of the medical supply chain.

Advise medical programmes planners on medical items’ supply chain and quality assurance requirements.

Make more informed responses and get the information needed sooner, when medical programmes colleagues request logistics support.

Medical specialists will be able to:

Plan medical programmes with an understanding of what logistics can and cannot do, and the logistics implications of medical programmes

Handle the medical supply while following the supply chain and quality assurance requirements of the medical items

Make requests of logistics colleagues that are more informed and specific to ensure the medical supply is properly handled and quality assurance is maintained

Course Fee & Registration

Course fees:
GBP900.00 (VAT at 20% must be added to this if you are intending to study within the European Union)

Course duration:
6 months (based on average study time of 5 hours per week)

Course Delivery:
This is a supported distance learning, online programme – ideally suited for those who need the flexibility to fit their studying around their own work and other commitments.

Registration may be done at any time through HLC certification, by clicking on the button below:

For further information please contact hlcregistrations at: hlcregistrations@logisticslearningalliance.com

How will you learn?

MedLog uses the innovative ‘competence model’ approach, which emphasizes application of skills, as opposed to the examination of knowledge. At the start of the course, the candidate (or student) is inserted into a reality-based scenario in which they must advise on and manage a medical supply chain. The tasks that they are requested to do are designed to facilitate the development of and demonstration that they have the required skills, as defined in the competence model.

Throughout the programmes, which is administered by the Logistics Learning Alliance, candidates are supported by learning coaches experienced in logistics. These coaches also assess candidates’ assignments and determine when they are ready to proceed to the next unit.

Candidates should expect to take 6 months to complete the programmes, studying approximately 5 hours per week. During that time, a portfolio documenting the candidates’ achievements and skills is collated for submission at the end of the programmes to the awarding body (CILT-UK) for final assessment.

How will you learn?

MedLog uses the innovative ‘competence model’ approach, which emphasizes application of skills, as opposed to the examination of knowledge. At the start of the course, the candidate (or student) is inserted into a reality-based scenario in which they must advise on and manage a medical supply chain. The tasks that they are requested to do are designed to facilitate the development of and demonstration that they have the required skills, as defined in the competence model.

Throughout the programmes, which is administered by the Logistics Learning Alliance, candidates are supported by learning coaches experienced in logistics. These coaches also assess candidates’ assignments and determine when they are ready to proceed to the next unit.

Candidates should expect to take 6 months to complete the programmes, studying approximately 5 hours per week. During that time, a portfolio documenting the candidates’ achievements and skills is collated for submission at the end of the programmes to the awarding body (CILT-UK) for final assessment.

What will you learn?

Unit 1: Humanitarian Supply Chains
Medical programmes and the supply of medical items place certain requirements on the supply chain process. An existing supply chain may not always be able to meet these requirements and will need changes to its design and/or operation to effectively support medical programmes.

This unit looks at the different types of medical programmes, their main characteristics, and the impact on the design and operation of the supply chain. It identifies that the characteristics of the items used in medical programmes have significant implications to the planning and operation of the supply chain. It considers these requirements as well as barriers and constraints to supplying, storing and transporting items used in medical programmes.

To plan and operate a medical supply chain requires information; the unit considers the type of information and documentation needed.

Finally, the unit also looks at how to maintain the flow within a medical supply chain. It does this by considering the actions that people take that can affect flow and performance of the overall supply chain.

Unit 2: Procurement
Procurement is a key part of the medical supply chain process in ensuring not only that items are sourced and obtained, but that these items meet the quality standards required. Procurement in different organizations may be carried out by a range of people, with various job titles and, because of its importance, there will usually be clear procedures and rules that need to be followed.

The unit focuses on the specific requirements for procuring medical items. These requirements may not be unique to medical items, but they are particularly important when procuring medical items compared to other non-medical items.

The unit starts by looking briefly at the function of procurement and the procurement process. It then looks at the specific requirements for procuring medical items. This is done by considering the stages in the procurement process where the requirements for procuring medical items are particularly important and/or require specific attention.

Unit 3: Storage
Storage is a key part of the medical supply chain pr0cess in ensuring that whenever and wherever items have to be stored in the supply chain network, they are stored in such a way that the quality of the items is maintained. The nature of medical supply chains means that there are often a number of places (warehouses and stores) where the items are stored before they are finally delivered or administered to beneficiaries. There are therefore a number of different people responsible for, and involved in the storage of medical items.

This unit focuses on the specific requirements for storing medical items. These requirements may not be unique to medical items, although there are a number that are unique, but they are particularly important when storing medical items compared to other non-medical items.

The unit begins by looking at the role of storage in medical supply chains. It then looks at the specific requirements for storing medical items followed by considering the role of inventory and how inventory must be managed. Finally, the unit finishes by considering the options for acquiring, owning and operating the storage facilities.

Unit 4: Transport
Transportation is a key part of the medical supply chain process in ensuring that whenever and wherever items need to be moved in the supply chain network, they are transported in such a way that the quality of the item is maintained. The nature of medical supply chains means that there are a number of occasions when the items need to be transported before they are delivered/administered to patients. There are therefore often a number of different people responsible for, and involved in, the transport and movement of the items.

The unit focuses on the specific requirements for transporting medical items. These requirements may not all be unique to medical items, but they are particularly important when transporting medical items compared to non-medical items.

The unit starts by looking at the role of transport in medical supply chains. It then considers the specific requirements for transporting and handling medical items. Finally, it considers the use of external transport providers to move medical items.

Unit 5: Disposal
The activities of a medical programme will lead to the production of waste. Some, if not most of this waste, is general waste that is not dangerous and will be disposed of in the same ways as general waste from other aspects of humanitarian aid programmes. However, some types of medical waste, if not disposed of correctly, can lead to risk to health and the environment. Unwanted and unused medical items often accumulate during a programme and after the programme has finished. These items will also need to be disposed of in a way that doesn’t lead to risks.

This unit focuses on the specific requirements for the disposal of medical waste – both waste from medical activities and waste in the form of unusable medical items.

The unit begins by looking at the importance of correct disposal of waste. It then considers the different types of waste. It continues on to look at the sources of unusable items that will require disposal. It finishes by considering the disposal process, the different methods of disposal and the consequences of improper or non-disposal of medical waste.

Course Fee & Registration

The fee includes all course materials, coach support and final assessment.
For details of the current course fees and payment options please press the button below button:
Registration may be done at any time through HLC certification, by clicking on the button below:
For further information please contact hlcregistrations at: hlcregistrations@logisticslearningalliance.com

Testimonial

”International Medical Corps is great supporter of LLA certification programs. We are proud that many of our staff completed courses while number of them is undergoing courses or are just about to be enrolled. Feedback from students is very good. Thank you Fritz Institute for initiating, LLA for administering professionally and to USAID and all other donors who contributed to make these unique courses available at reasonable cost, or through scholarships.”

Marin Tomas
Global Logistics Manager, International Medical Corps